The Inaugural Indigenous Women’s Leadership Symposium

Friday 29th November​ 2019

Intercontinental Sydney

117 Macquarie Street Sydney NSW

Standard Rate

Early Bird Rate*

3 delegates:

8+ delegates:

$1,195 pp + GST

$695 pp + GST

$645 pp + GST

$595 pp + GST

This event has sold out.

Please email events@wla.edu.au if you would like to be put on a waiting list.

Friday 29th November, 2019

InterContinental Sydney

117 Macquarie Street Sydney NSW​

Christine Ross is an Arrernte/Kaytetye desert woman who was born in Alice Springs and grew up in Darwin. She moved to Perth in 2002. Christine’s career began as a teacher in the NT which included 4 years as the Manager of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Educators Support Unit. Christine was also the General Manager of the Central Australian Aboriginal Media Association (CAAMA) in Alice Springs in 1999- 2001. Christine has worked in the Resource Sector of WA for a number of years both as Indigenous Employment Superintendent in 2011 with Leighton Contractors Mining Division and the former Manager of Indigenous Relations for Laing O’Rourke. Christine has been the Acting CEO of NATSIWA since March 2019.

Teela Reid is a proud Wiradjuri and Wailwan woman, lawyer and activist born and raised in Gilgandra western NSW. She is a solicitor with experience practicing in criminal, civil and administrative law. Teela was involved as a working group leader on s 51(xxvi), the Race Power, in the Constitutional dialogue process that culminated in the Uluru Statement from the Heart.

Teela was the first Aboriginal person to be elected on the UNSW Law Society as Vice-President (Social Justice), where she was the founding director of the UNSW Law First Peoples Moot. She was also the Inaugural recipient of the NSW Indigenous Barristers Trust award. In 2017, Teela was selected to attend Harvard University as a global Emerging Leader.

Licia Heath is CEO of the for-purpose organisation, Women for Election Australia (WFEA), a non-partisan group committed to inspire and equip more women to successfully run for office at the local, state and federal levels. Licia ran as an Independent candidate in the high-profile Wentworth by-election in October 2018 and helped shape the political debate on a national platform. In addition, over the past two years she’s initiated and led the campaign for a new public high school in Sydney’s Eastern suburbs. Licia’s experience of seeding and leading an issue-based campaign, her decision to run for public office and her role with WFEA, combine to show the positive effects of engaging in the political process in Australia. Licia will speak on the importance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women running for office and how they can connect with Women for Election Australia to find support to get elected.

Dr Michelle Evans holds an Associate Professorship in Leadership at the Faculty of Business and Economics at the University of Melbourne, specialising in the areas of Indigenous leadership and entrepreneurship. She is also co-Founder and Program Director of the award winning MURRA Indigenous Business Masterclass Program, based at Melbourne Business School where she completed her PhD. Dr Evans has been awarded three Australian Research Council competitive grants and a Fulbright Scholarship. Dr Evans believes that the path to Indigenous self-determination is economic independence.  In addition to establishing MURRA, Dr Evans has also established other initiatives designed to support Indigenous entrepreneurship including Walan Mayingu Indigenous entrepreneurship pop-up Hub, Indigenous Business Month and collaborated on the Native Title Operations and Management Training Program with the National Native Title Council.

Nova Peris OAM OLY MAICD was Australia's first Aboriginal woman elected to Federal Parliament and the first Aboriginal Australian and Northern Territorian to win an Olympic Gold Medal. She is one of a very few athletes who have represented their country in two different sports; hockey and athletics in separate Olympic Games. Peris is currently addressing the licensing issues surrounding the Aboriginal flag in a campaign called #freetheflag. She took the fight to Canberra with two other people and has successfully got a motion passed in the senate through Greens Senator Rachel Siewert calling on the government to do everything possible to free the flag. In 2018, Nova received the NT Award for Excellence in Women's Leadership from Women & Leadership Australia.

09:00 - 09:05            Welcome to Country  |  Aunty Donna Ingram

09:05 - 09:20

Welcome and Opening Comments

KAT HENAWAY

Founder & Director, Women’s Business

SUZI FINKELSTEIN

Director Leadership & Advocacy, Women & Leadership Australia

09:30 - 10:00

Keynote Address

Christine Ross

Managing Director, Christine Ross Consultancy; NATSIWA Representative

10:30 - 11:00

Keynote Address

Teela May Reid

Lawyer, Educator and Activist

11:00 - 11:20            Morning Tea​

11:20 - 12:40

Panel Discussion

Perspectives and insights from emerging leaders

   

12:40 - 13:20            Lunch Break

13:20 - 13:50

Keynote Address

Licia Heath

Women for Election Australia

13:50 - 14:40

DEVELOPMENT SESSION

Women Kind: Unlocking the power of women supporting women

   

17:00 - 18:00            Networking Drinks​

15:10 - 15:30            Afternoon Tea

14:40 - 15:10

Keynote Address

Dr Michelle Evans

Director, Murra Business School, MBS, The University of Melbourne

15:30 - 16:10

Keynote Address

June Oscar AO

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner

16:10 - 16:50

Keynote Address

Nova Peris

Former Federal Senator and Olympian

16:50 - 17:00

Closing Comments

KAT HENAWAY

Founder & Director, Women’s Business

SUZI FINKELSTEIN

Director Leadership & Advocacy, Women & Leadership Australia

Women’s Leadership Symposium​

INDIGENOUS​

THE INAUGURAL

29 November 2019

InterContinental Sydney

09:20 - 09:30            Sponsor Address

Barbie-Lee Kirby is a Ngemba/Wailwan, Baakindji and Yuwaalaraay woman from Brewarrina, NSW. She is a strong ambassador for education and successful Indigenous women in business. She has a Bachelor of Business with majors in Accounting and Law and after completing the Finance Graduate Program, is now Manager Corporate Governance at Qantas Airways. Barbie-Lee was a NASCA participant whilst playing representative netball where she was selected into the NSW emerging athletes program. She was the first woman to be awarded CareerTrackers student of the year in 2016 and was co-founder and president of the first UTS Indigenous club which creates an Indigenous presence on the UTS campus and an awareness and celebration of Indigenous culture.

Barbie-Lee Kirby

Citizenship Executive, Herbert Smith Freehills

Maree Ansey is a proud Aboriginal and Torres Islander woman from Broome, Western Australia. Her Aboriginal heritage hails from the Yawuru and Karrajarri people of the Kimberley region and the Meriam people of the Torres Strait Islands. With over 16 years’ experience working in Indigenous Affairs, the majority of which has been within the mining, resources and construction industries, Maree has a wealth of knowledge and experience in:

- Indigenous policy and strategic development,

- Development and implementation of Reconciliation Action Plans,

- Leading Indigenous and social procurement programs,

- Driving recruitment training and employment initiatives,

- Implementing cultural awareness programs and Indigenous community and stakeholder management.

Maree Ansey

Indigenous Affairs Lead, Laing O'Rourke

Lynda-June Coe is a sovereign Wiradjuri and Torres Strait Islander woman, PhD Candidate, Activist and Educator from Erambie, Cowra NSW.  Her research focus is re-centring Indigenous sovereignty, decolonisation and nation-building. She is passionate about self-determination and revitalising Indigenous governance as practice, having initiated and co-created the Wiradjuri Buyaa (Law) Council in 2018. Over the past ten years, Lynda-June has also engaged in Indigenous-led activism supporting national campaigns such as ‘Water is Life’ Climate Action, Aboriginal Deaths in Custody, Juvenile Detention Centres (in particular Don Dale) and institutional settler-colonial violence.  She believes that Indigenous leadership is embodied through cultural-empowerment and achieved by advancing the unique rights of our people and communities.

Lynda-June Coe

PhD Candidate, The University of Newcastle; Activist, Educator

10:00 - 10:30

Keynote Address

Belinda Duarte

CEO, Culture is Life

Belinda Duarte is a Wotjobaluk, Dja Dja Wurrung descendant with Polish and Celtic heritage. She is the CEO of Culture is Life, a not-for-profit organisation committed to cultural strengthening for the prevention Aboriginal youth suicide. She holds a range of appointed and voluntary positions including: Co-Chair of Reconciliation Victoria, Director of Western Bulldogs, Deputy Chair Responsible Gambling Victoria, MCG trustee, member of the Victorian Premier’s Jobs and Investment Panel and board member of the AnnaMilla Foundation.

$1,195 pp + GST

$695 pp + GST
$645 pp + GST
$595 pp + GST

Standard Rate

Early Bird Rate*
3 delegates:
8+ delegates:

June Oscar AO is a proud Bunuba woman from the remote town of Fitzroy Crossing in Western Australia’s Kimberly region. She is a strong advocate for Indigenous Australian languages, social justice, women’s issues, and has worked tirelessly to reduce Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). June has held a raft of influential positions including Deputy Director of the Kimberley Land Council, chair of the Kimberley Language Resource Centre and the Kimberley Interpreting Service and Chief Investigator with WA’s Lililwan Project addressing FASD. She was appointed to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (1990) and was a winner of the 100 Women of Influence 2013 in the Social Enterprise and Not For Profit category. In 2015 June received the Menzies School of Health Research Medallion for her work with FASD.

Florence Drummond is the co-founder of Indigenous Women in Mining Australia. This national initiative was founded to greater support and showcase Indigenous women in the sector. With the Mining & Resources industry traditionally being male dominated, there is increasing importance to foster professional development for female participants. Florence was born and raised on Thursday Island. Her parents prioritised education, and sent her to secondary boarding school, where she would soon grow her knowledge of other cultures and people worldwide. This helped greatly to understand the importance of education and to strive to promote the value of education amongst communities today. Empowering indigenous women in the mining & resource sector is a strong channel to promote and sustain real change.

Florence Drummond

Founder, Indigenous Women in Mining Australia

This event has sold out.

Please email events@wla.edu.au if you would like to be put on a waiting list.